Symbol ≤ and ≥

jumera shared this idea 1 week ago
Declined

Bonjour

Je sais bien que les symboles

be1efb661c3721e24b23903f970f96b2

qui sont un "standard" dans les logiciels (traitement de texte notamment (avec la barre horizontale)

Pourquoi GeoGebra, qui est un logiciel de Mathématiques, n'utilise pas

4bb4afdce7e76c8748f4dfca9c6bf92a

?

Comments (15)

photo
1

ok

i ask it differently

In France, all teachers and school books * use 807533ccc788bfe12a53f13d61a13317

Perhaps, in other countries, they use ≤ ≥..?

@ Michael : in England perhaps..? or other countries..?


Edit * and students..!

photo
1

Interesting, but we won't be adding an option to use that

photo
photo
1

Yep

It was my next answer, but mathematic gave it before


"but we won't be adding an option to use that"

It is not an option. It is referring to symbols that every teacher, every book, every student use in mathematics

GeoGebra isn't a Mathematics Software Program..?


It is only an unicode number to change...

I really don't understand why Mathematicians refuse use Mathematician's notations !

photo
1

compatibility with old works??????

photo
1

It's just the difference between the handwritten form and the type-set form. (Same for "g" - can look very different in books) https://qz.com/1244871/why-does-the-letter-g-look-different-in-print-than-in-handwriting/


GeoGebra uses the type-set form for obvious reasons

https://www.google.com/sear...

photo
2

those are type-set form..? (and \sslash)9eb55ce800eddb986f48258e40d4172e

photo
1

Yes, you're right. There are just 2 conventions...

photo
photo
1

every book
Sorry, but that just isn't true. Different publishers around the world have different "house styles" for this (& please avoid hyperbole)

photo
1

ok

But, on an other way, you hide all my answer

It is not an option. It is referring to symbols that every teacher, every student use in mathematics
...

I wish you'd told me that you don't do it because you can't (for technical reasons)

but that if you could have, as a mathematician, you would have done it

So, it is too bad... but no problem

Thank's for all your previous answers

photo
1

Personally I prefer the same style as you. Technically we could also change it - now that I know about

⩽ ⩾ \leqslant \leqslant


However it's not the right decision for a lot of the world so we won't change it, OK?

photo
1

Sorry, i have a flaw : i am a teacher and i love understand...

and also, sometimes, i feel like i belong to a community...


I wish i knew in which country a mathematic teacher write ≤ and ≥ on the black (or white) board


but you said


OK?

So... it is ok

thread closed

photo
1

and also, sometimes, i feel like i belong to a community...

toujours le mot pour rire

photo
© 2020 International GeoGebra Institute