How to hide asymptotes?

Supreme Blorgon shared this question 4 years ago
Answered

I'm working on a trigonometric graphic calculator, and I'd like for the graphic view to NOT show the vertical asymptotes of the csc(x), sec(x), tan(x), and cot(x) functions.


Strangely, Geogebra only displays the vertical asymptotes of the tan(x) and sec(x) functions, but not the other two functions. Why is this?

Comments (5)

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I do not see them in windows or https://www.geogebra.org/graphing or android 7fc9cde48ae4a8f6cd280a9be4d29786

where do you see them?

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I think the question is different:


"Strangely, Geogebra only displays the vertical asymptotes of the tan(x)

and sec(x) functions, but not the other two functions. Why is this?"


I tried that at the WebApp of GeoGebra and got for every function one asymptote in a List.

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I assume you are referring to this worksheet:

https://www.geogebra.org/m/KzETDRAj


short aswer: try changing the visible area by moving or zooming the view.


long answer: You are seeing extra vertical lines because it's hard for GeoGebra (or other function plotting software) to determine where are the discontinuities. Let's assume one pixel represents 0.02 units. GeoGebra computes case f(x) and f(x+0.02), if they differ a lot it assumes there is discontinuity and does not connect the points, otherwise it draws a line between (x,f(x)) and (x+0.02,f(x+0.02)). Problem is what "differs a lot" means -- if the threshold is too low we would miss parts of continuous functions, if it's too high we get the extra vertical asymptotes.

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Hmm. Okay. For some reason, when I first posted this, I was unaware that new posts needed moderation, and I figured it some how didn't post because I didn't see it anywhere. Also never got notifications of replies, so I'm just now seeing these, after having posted another thread about it.


I can't consistently get the window to not display those connections. Annoying, but I guess there's not much to be done.

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try zoomin[1.01]

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