Gridlines

furiouslogic shared this idea 13 years ago
Answered

Hi all, in grid options, it's possible to show up only x-gridlines or only y-gridlines?


thanks,


FL

Comments (9)

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This would require that there be a sub-menu within Grid tab as there is within the Axis tab. This would be beneficial when doing histograms that are coming in the new version.


Tony

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Hi,


You can vary the distance between the grid lines in both x and y directions, so you can always make one distance so large there are no grid lines visible!


Kathryn

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This would not fix the problem stated for many situations. It is useful to be able to switch grid lines on/off by choice as programs such as winplot and others do.


Tony

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Hi,

I use Winplot too - how do you switch off gridlines in individual directions there? My version seems to have less flexibility than GeoGebra does on axes and grids.

But yes, an on/off toggle on grid lines in individual directions could be a helpful option. But I can work around it!

K.

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My bad, not WinPlot, but Graph by http://www.padowan.dk/graph/.


It is also available with most spreadsheets.


Although, I bet that Richard Parris at Exeter Academy could make that a feature if he was convinced of its need. It does work with the users of his programs quite well.


Tony

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Hi all, in grid options, it's possible to show up only x-gridlines or only y-gridlines?


There is a way... in the gridlines menu, use for the x distance 1000000 (same for y) and you'll get just horizontal gridlines... if 1000000 is not enough, use more zeros... :D

photo
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Hi all, in grid options, it's possible to show up only x-gridlines or only y-gridlines?


No, but you can do custom gridlines with Sequence[] in the pre-release version. See the customAxes.ggb file here:

http://www.geogebra.org/for...

photo
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ok then I'll change my post:


... in grid options, it's possible to add a new option to show up only x-gridlines or only y-gridlines?


thanks :D


FL

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Yes, I agree.


Another nice option would be to use PI/3, PI/4, or PI/6 instead of just PI/2.


Thanks.


Tony

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