This object is in archive! 

GGB3D and Chemistry

LPH shared this question 9 years ago
Answered

Hi all,


I think that GGB3D could be a very nice help for many applications in chemistry courses.

For instance, it could be really interesting with some additional styles of segments to represent simple structures of molecules in chemistry (see below some propositions).

The objective is not to replace specialized software, but to highlight simple situations. The 3D representations of molecules as well as their organizations are very difficult to understand for pupils and I think that GGB3D could help here the teacher.


Thank you in advance to consider this proposal.

Phil.

https://ggbm.at/545641792ac2560fffc24740a7daff87803826

Comments (3)

photo
1

Oh no!

Sorry, I think thats absolutly not needed.


As you said, there are specialized Programms. And there are Programms that are simply enough for teachers and pupils and even freeware or free to schools, pupils and students.


Two good are ChemSketch (only Windows) and the other is MarvinSketch (Java-> all Plattforms => a bit more complicated but you can get it.)

In both you can draw just by clicking ... so why use GeoGebra for that?


I must admit, that I used once GeoGebra once for Chemistry, but not more: I wanted to draw a circle with dots on it, representing the electrons arround the nucleus. Thats was very easy with GeoGebra.


Sorry ... Birgit

photo
1

Hi Birgit,

Oh no!

Sorry, I think thats absolutly not needed.

Sorry to have shocked you so!

I would like to tell you to do not be worry about my proposition, and it is not necessary to take offence in an excessive way: We can always use GGB to make a little of mathematics.

As you said, there are specialized Programms. And there are Programms that are simply enough for teachers and pupils and even freeware or free to schools, pupils and students.


Two good are ChemSketch (only Windows) and the other is MarvinSketch (Java-> all Plattforms => a bit more complicated but you can get it.)

In both you can draw just by clicking ... so why use GeoGebra for that?

I know these programms very well. I think only that your point of view is too restrictive to mathematics only. Perhaps it’s a surprise for you but many people use GGB for non mathematic applications (Maybe a bad piece of news).

For example Physicists study very different systems in numerous domains: In classic mechanics, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, optics, in and so on... In each domain, there are specialized programs and should we all use them to approach elementary notions with the pupils?

GGB is, at the moment, the software which allows me to study these systems in a satisfactory way.


I must admit, that I used once GeoGebra once for Chemistry, but not more: I wanted to draw a circle with dots on it, representing the electrons arround the nucleus. Thats was very easy with GeoGebra.


Sorry

I am really very happy that you authorize me to use GGB in atomistic for one or two electrons... no more: I shall try, thanks! Fortunately I did not wait for your point of view to prepare my courses!

I am sorry to have not well understood why to add a style of double or triple line was so disgusting... It is an excessive, even contemptuous reaction for my teaching colleagues of chemistry.


I have already read and estimated the correctness of your interventions on the forum, but here I am profoundly disappointed and I am really... sorry for you.


Best regards,

Phil.

photo
1

I think the use of GeoGebra in other areas is particularly exciting (and I think exisiting users will benefit in unexpected ways too :) )

© 2020 International GeoGebra Institute