GeoGebra 4.0

Markus Hohenwarter shared this question 11 years ago
Answered

You can run GeoGebra 4.0 directly here:

http://www.geogebra.org/web...


and GeoGebraPrim here:

http://www.geogebra.org/web...

Comments (5)

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1

GeoGebra 3.9.118.0 has support for logging directly from some Vernier USB Data Loggers, eg Go!Motion and Go!Temp.


If you run it using this link, it will also load a ggb file with appropriate scripts to start and stop logging (which you can examine to see how they work)

http://www.geogebra.org/web...


At the moment you can't do much without writing some JavaScript, so please feel free to tell us in the forums what you want to make it easier to use!

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The last weeks I have added or updated some commands, which could probably be improved with your help:


LeftSum[ <Function>, <Number a>, <Number b>, <Number n> ]

Calculates the left sum of the function in the interval [a, b] using n rectangles.


RectangleSum[ <Function>, <Number a>, <Number b>, <Number n>, <Number d>]

Calculates the sum of rectangles with left height starting at a fraction d of each interval using n rectangles. (0<=d<=1)


Extremum[ <Function>, <left-x>, <right-x> ]

Calculates the extremums of the function between left-x and right-x. Function should preferably be continuous in the interval, otherwise false

extremums near discontinuity might be calculated.


Min[ <Function>, <left-x>, <right-x> ]

Calculates the minimum point for function in the given interval. Function should only have one minimum point in the interval.


Max <Function>, <left-x>, <right-x> ]

Calculates the maximum point for function in the given interval. Function should only have on maximum point in the interval.


Roots[ <Function>, <left-x>, <right-x> ]

Calculates the roots for the function in the given interval.


Intersect[<Function>, <Function>,<left-x>, <right-x>]

Calculates the intersections between the two functions in the given interval.


The last two are a bit experimental, just a warning:


Maximize[ <Number dependent>, <Number independent> ]


Calculates the independent number which gives the maximal value of the dependent number.

The independent number must be a slider and the slider interval will be used as the search interval.

If the construction is complicated, this command might fail or quit to avoid using too much processor time.


Minimize[ <Number dependent>, <Number independent> ]

Calculates the independent number which gives the minimal value of the dependent number.

The independent number must be a slider and the slider interval will be used as the search interval.

If the construction is complicated, this command might fail or quit to avoid using too much processor time.


Maximize and Minimize try to treat a compound construction as a function with a slider as an independent

variable into one end and treats the dependent number coming out in the other end as a function

value. (This dependent variable can be a number, area of a polygon, length of a segment or an angle.)


(For internal and quite complicated reasons the slider is not adjusted to the optimal value, the commands

just returns a numbervalue with the hopefully optimal value.)

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In the last beta 3.9.194 we have made an extension to thecurve-fitting Fit[] command:


Up to now we had this functionality:


Fit[<List of Points>,<List of Functions>]

-----------------------------------------


Fits a linear combination of functions to the points in the list.

If we have a list of points;

L={A,B,C,...}

functions;

f(x)=1, g(x)=x, h(x)=e^x

collected in a list;

F={f,g,h}

the command

Fit{L,F}

fits a function of the form a + bx + ce^x to the points in the list.


Now the Fit-command in addition performs a general non-linear curvefit:


Fit[ <List of Points>, Function]

--------------------------------


Only one function, but it must have one

or more sliders as parameters.

The values of the parameters will be used as a starting point for

an iteration that hopefully returns a new function where the

parameters have been changed to constants to give the best fit.


In contrast to more specialized statistics software the GeoGebra

user can give starting values with sliders instead of filling

out a long command line with parameter names and starting

values. (Typically Fit(funtionexpression, [p1,p2,...],[p1s,p2s,...]) )


Example:


You have a list of points like L={A,B,C,D,E,F}

and a function f(x)=a + b/(x - c)

where a,b and c are sliders.


Fit[L,f] returns a new function with a,b and c

set to optimal values to get a least sum of squared errors.


Be aware that convergence to a solution is not guaranteed

in nonlinear curvefitting, a typical result will be an

undefined function.

Usually the convergence is higly dependent on the starting

values, so adjust the sliders a,b and c and try again :-)

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Since 3.9.201 when you export to HTML, you can use \(inline math\) and $$display math$$. The result will be rendered nicely via MathJax. Note that this solution works only when you have access to the internet (for local exports without internet access you need to download MathJax and change URL of the script in exported file).


Note: MathJax has other limitations than JLatexMath, so when you try things that work in GeoGebra itself, you can run into problems in the export. Should work flawlessly for simple stuff like

\(f_{n+2}=\frac{f_{n+1}}{f_n}\)

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It works well here except for an excess of <br />s added by GG:

Exported

    <p>

    $$ P(E) = {n \choose k} p^k (1-p)^{ n-k} $$ <br/>

    <br/>

    <br/>

    <br/>

    Try inline \( P(E) = {n \choose k} p^k (1-p)^{ n-k} \) formulas.</p>

Code pasted into Text above the construction

    $$ P(E) = {n \choose k} p^k (1-p)^{ n-k} $$


    Try inline \( P(E) = {n \choose k} p^k (1-p)^{ n-k} \) formulas.

Great feature add.


Tony


PS Down load and look at Export text.

https://ggbm.at/548211

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